The Dividing Line: 
Film and Performance About Border Control and Border Crossing
Mar
4
to Jun 18

The Dividing Line: 
Film and Performance About Border Control and Border Crossing

The Dividing Line: Film and Performance About Border Control and Border Crossing is CAMP’s third exhibition in our 2-year exhibition program Migration Politics. As one European government after another is responding to the biggest refugee and irregular migrant flood ever recorded by tightening border controls and asylum and deportation policies, Europe has become the world’s most dangerous migration route and the Mediterranean sea the world’s most dangerous border crossing, according to IOM (International Organization for Migration). CAMP wants this exhibition to take a deeper look at this situation and provide a lens through which to better understand the complex interplay between human migration and border politics.

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from the mountains to the valleys, from the deserts to the seas: journeys of historical uncertainty
Sep
25
to Nov 14

from the mountains to the valleys, from the deserts to the seas: journeys of historical uncertainty

CAMP (Center for Art on Migration Politics) is proud to present a solo exhibition by one of Vietnam’s most respected artists, Tiffany Chung. from the mountains to the valleys, from the deserts to the seas: journeys of historical uncertainty presents a series of recent and new works made especially for CAMP, which explore different aspects of the politics of displacement and flight. 

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Camp Life: Artistic reflections on the politics of refugee and migrant detention
Apr
17
to Jun 14

Camp Life: Artistic reflections on the politics of refugee and migrant detention

Camp Life is CAMP’s very first exhibition. It zooms in on the refugee camp, the asylum center, and the detention center as the nation-state’s perhaps most extreme responses to human migration. The exhibition shows projects by 9 international contemporary artists and collectives, who examine the politics of detaining refugees and migrants in exceptional spaces. In different ways, their artworks ask what kind of space the ‘camp’ is, which functions it performs, what political-juridical structures have made camps possible, and what living in a camp does to the subjectivity, body, and soul of camp residents.

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